Volcanic Activity Bulletins

Volcano Activity Bulletins (VABs) are New Zealand's official source of volcano status information including the current Volcanic Alert Level (VAL). They are issued on an as needed basis summarising the volcano status and recent events. They can indicate if activity is increasing, decreasing, or in a steady state. They may contain forecasts, highlight developing, or expected problems.
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Recent gas and observation flights over Whakaari/White Island confirm the level of activity remains low. The primary surface activity is steam and gas emissions from the active vents with minor geysering in two craters. There is no evidence of any eruptive activity. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2.


Te Wai ā-moe (Ruapehu Crater Lake) has entered a new heating episode, currently being 29 °C. Other volcanic monitoring indicators remain within normal ranges. Volcanic activity remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Green.


Gas and observation flights over the past two months confirm the level of activity at Whakaari/White Island remains low. The primary surface activity is still mostly minor steam and gas emissions from the active vents. No eruptive activity was observed in the past few months, and beside some drop in water level in the crater lake, the active crater has not changed significantly. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2.


The earthquake monitoring system at Mt Ruapehu has recently recorded a sequence of small earthquakes at 3-6 km depth clustered under the volcano. Te Wai ā-moe (Ruapehu Crater Lake) is slowly heating, currently reaching 19 °C. Other volcanic monitoring indicators remain within normal ranges. Volcanic activity remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Green. 


After a short heating phase starting mid-July this year, Te Wai ā-moe (Ruapehu Crater Lake) has now cooled back down. Other monitoring indicators are within normal ranges for Mt Ruapehu. Volcanic activity remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Green.


Based on gas and observation flights over the last few months, we conclude activity at Whakaari/White Island remains limited to minor steam and gas emissions. No eruptive activity was detected over the past few months, and changes in the active crater area have been minimal. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2.


Te Wai ā-moe (Ruapehu Crater Lake) is into another heating phase, and has reached 26 °C, rising from a low of 11 °C in July. Other monitoring indicators remain within normal ranges for such a heating episode. Volcanic activity remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Green.


Te Wai ā-moe (Ruapehu Crater Lake) has now stopped cooling and started to reheat, rising 4 °C over the last 2 weeks. The lake temperature is now reaching 15 °C. Other monitoring indicators remain within normal ranges and the overall level of volcanic activity remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Green. 


Based on observations over the last month, activity at Whakaari/White Island has been limited to minor steam and gas emissions. There have been no significant changes in the active crater area. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2


Monitoring at Taupō Volcano shows that both ground deformation and earthquake activity have continued to decrease over the past few weeks. These monitoring data indicate the level of unrest has now returned to what is normally seen as the background. The Volcanic Alert Level is now lowered to Level 0 for Taupō Volcano.