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In 2023 we located 21,300 earthquakes in and around Aotearoa New Zealand. So, is that a lot for us? It’s actually pretty spot on!


Recent gas and observation flights over Whakaari/White Island confirm the level of activity remains low. The primary surface activity is steam and gas emissions from the active vents with minor geysering in two craters. There is no evidence of any eruptive activity. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2.


Te Wai ā-moe (Ruapehu Crater Lake) has entered a new heating episode, currently being 29 °C. Other volcanic monitoring indicators remain within normal ranges. Volcanic activity remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Green.


10 years ago, on 20 January 2014 at 3:52 pm a M6.2 earthquake occurred 15 km east of Eketāhuna, under the south-east of the North Island. The quake was felt strongly in both islands, with multiple reports of damage.


Welcome, haere mai to another GeoNet Data Blog. Today’s blog is a little bit different. We are going to give some details about how we are changing access to one of our data sets, manually collected volcano data.


Last month

We take a quick look back at the happenings and highlights at GeoNet.


Today in history: 24 December 1953 at 10:21pm, Mt Ruapehu’s crater lake outlet collapsed sending a dam-break lahar down the mountain and causing the Tangiwai rail disaster.


Welcome, haere mai to another GeoNet Data Blog. Today we are going to talk numbers, specifically numbers showing how our data collection has grown over time. We’ll look into what are the biggest data sets and see how the rate of data growth hasn’t been the same for each data set. Sometimes size matters, and sometimes it doesn’t!


Gas and observation flights over the past two months confirm the level of activity at Whakaari/White Island remains low. The primary surface activity is still mostly minor steam and gas emissions from the active vents. No eruptive activity was observed in the past few months, and beside some drop in water level in the crater lake, the active crater has not changed significantly. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2.


2 months ago

Powered by GeoNet and GNS Science experts – today we’re celebrating the fifth birthday of our National Geohazards Monitoring Centre / Te Puna Mōrearea i te Rū (NGMC), a purpose-built facility providing around-the-clock monitoring of tsunami, volcano, earthquake and landslide hazards to help keep New Zealanders safe.